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The Appetizer Radio Show

Serving up your connection to new and emerging artists along with established legends each week.

Connect with us using these platforms to discover fresh flavors of music from the known as well as the unknown.

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Say YES To Summer Playlist & Player


FreshForsummer-Condensed

Hour 1 Playlist

Lindsay Katt. “Heart Place (Instrumental)” Picking Out Boxes. Lindsay Katt, 2008. 01:30
Brett Dennen. “Wild Child” Smoke and Mirrors. Atlantic Recording, 2013. 03:39
Brett Dennen. “Who I Am” Smoke and Mirrors. Atlantic Recording, 2013. 03:27

Sara Watkins. “Invisible” Young In All The Wrong Ways. Nonesuch Records, 2016. 05:21
Sara Watkins. “One Last Time” Young In All The Wrong Ways. Nonesuch Records, 2016. 03:08
Brandi Carlile. “God Only Knows” Songs Of Summer-An Amazon Original. Amazon Music, 2016. 03:46

Sublime with Rome. “Secrets” Songs Of Summer-An Amazon Original. Amazon Music, 2016. 03:22
Tiny Purple Fishes. “Get Lost With You” Get Lost With You. Independent, 2016. 04:44
Tiny Purple Fishes. “I Don’t Care” Get Lost With You. Independent, 2016. 02:30

Band Of Horses. “The Funeral” Band of Horses/Cat Power. Sub Pop, 2013. 05:24
Band Of Horses. “The First Song” Band of Horses/Cat Power. Sub Pop, 2013. 03:45

Jonah Smith. “Try Your Best” Easy Prey. Music Road Records, 2016. 04:11
Jonah Smith. “On Love We Can Survive” Easy Prey. Music Road Records, 2016. 04:09

Callenberg. “Dive” Lost In The Mail. Bend Records, 2016. 03:15
Callenberg. “Resignation” Lost In The Mail. Bend Records, 2016. 02:34

Calliope Musicals. “What My Eyes Found” Time Owes You Nothing. Calliope Musicals, 2016. 03:02
Calliope Musicals. “Morning Ground” Time Owes You Nothing. Calliope Musicals, 2016. 03:13

Hour 2 Playlist

Lindsay Katt. “Heart Place (Instrumental)” Picking Out Boxes. Lindsay Katt, 2008. 01:50

Pearl Jam. “Force Of Nature” Backspacer. Pearl Jam, 2009. 04:03
Pearl Jam. “Got Some” Backspacer. Pearl Jam, 2009. 03:02

Third Eye Blind. “Danger” Out Of the Vein. Elektra entertainment, 2003. 03:12
Third Eye Blind. “Water Landing” From Third Eye Blind To You: A Mixtape. Elektra entertainment, 2003. 04:29

The Dear Hunter. “Waves” Act IV: Rebirth in Reprise. Equal Vision Records, 2015. 04:12
The Dear Hunter. “A Night On The Town” Act IV: Rebirth in Reprise. Equal Vision Records, 2015. 08:50

Benjamin Dunn and the Animal Orchestra. “Sing” Fable. Benjamin Dunn, 2003. 04:16
Benjamin Dunn and the Animal Orchestra. “London” Fable. Benjamin Dunn, 2003. 03:41

Lenny Kravitz. “California” Baptism. Virgin Records America, 2004. 02:37
Lenny Kravitz. “What Did I Do With My LIfe” Baptism. Virgin Records America, 2004. 04:04

LCD Soundsystem. “New York I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down” Sound Of Silver. DFA LLC, 2007. 05:35
LCD Soundsystem. “All My Friends” Sound Of Silver. DFA LLC, 2007. 07:37
Samsel & The Skirt. “Who’s Holding Your Heart” Shoebox. Samsel & The Skirt, 2014. 04:00

Grandma, Tell Me About The Good Ol’Days

This article was originally posted on The Vinyl Vortex. The original article and others by Gabe Crawford can be found here. Follow Gabe Crawford on Twitter for all his music musings @gabecrawford and @thevinylvortex.


 

“He [Doolittle Lynn] said every one of ’em was a hit…..shoot it was a hit and miss.”

This quote comes from the beginning of Loretta Lynn’s new album, Full Circle, from the Coal Miner’s Daughter herself. She claimed her husband (Doolittle Lynn) insisted every song she wrote was a hit. Loretta didn’t agree.

But everybody can be wrong sometimes.

Lynn and her late husband Doolittle.

Lynn and her late husband Doolittle.

It has been over 10 years since Lynn has released an album of new material. Her last album, Van Lear Rose, was released in 2004. It was produced by Jack White and had great commercial and critical success. It is one of her most profound works, but her fans and the country music crowd are not writing Lynn off any time soon. Her new album is met with anticipation and excitement.

As a long time Lynn devotee I was counting down the days since she first confirmed she would be releasing a new album. I have nearly every album Lynn has made (I am only missing 1!). I’ve seen her in concert and have spent hundreds of dollars on memorabilia. Once the release date came I contacted my local record store to see if they received this new gem on vinyl.

They immediately put it behind the counter for me to come purchase. They have lived with me through my Lynn pilgrimage. This is serious business.

I rushed home once I purchased this record and immediately put it on my turntable. It’s safe to say it was love at first spin.

The album opens with a conversation between Lynn and what I assume is her producers John Carter Cash (Johnny Cash and June Carter’s son) and Patsy Lynn Russell (Lynn’s Daughter), and various studio musicians. She easily recalls the first song she ever wrote, “Whispering Sea” taking the listener back to the beginning of her career. She then opens this album with a modern version of “Whispering Sea.”

74282205-x600It has been 56 years since Lynn first recorded this song. It was the B side to her first single “Honky Tonk Girl.” I went back and listened to the orignal recording to compare it to her new version. Both versions are excellent in both composition and deliverance. The first version portrays a naive and vulnerable spirit whereas today’s version has elements of maturity, grace, and wisdom. It’s profound what happened here and to think this was the first song! This same element is heard in her remakes of “Everybody Want’s to Go to Heaven” and “Fist City.”

The album proceeds into a new composition, “Secret Love.” This song sounds like it could be off of her first album. She then sings a song entitled “Who’s Gonna Miss Me?” This is a simple answer, everybody. Lynn was one of the primary writers of this song and the listener is once again met with a tone and deliverance that sounds so fresh it could come from one of her first albums, yet it shows the continued humility Lynn possess. This is what I believe has sustained her in the music industry and what has fueled her staying power.

The answer to the question this song asks “Who’s Gonna Miss Me?” is a hard one to answer. Lynn will have listeners from the past, present, and future miss her. Her music is immortal and her wisdom is timeless. So whos gonna miss her? It will forever be impossible to answer.

Next we are met with a story song, “Black Jack David.” There are three chief story tellers in country music, Lynn, Dolly Parton, and Reba McEntire. All three tell their stories differently, but each one makes you live their tale. Wrapping up Side A is Lynn’s version of the classic song, “Always on My Mind.” Lynn gives a rousing performance that I feel reminiscences on her life. It reminds me of her late husband and her children and the love she has for her entire family. That’s who she talks to in her spiritual and encompassing performance of this classic ballad.

Loretta_Lynn_022_V2Side B contains the new tunes, “Wine Into Water,” the spiritual “In The Pines,” and “Band of Gold.” These again sound as fresh as Lynn’s first recordings, but they encompass that same wisdom to her listeners. The greatest takeaways from Side B are her duets with Elvis Costello and Willie Nelson.

First, she duets with Elvis Costello on “Everything it Takes.” This is your classic country song talking of love lost to another woman. It is a lecture to her man about how his new woman will “take everything he’s got.” This track that could be easily taken from her 1966 album, You Ain’t Woman Enough.

Lastly, she duets with her fellow country legend, Willie Nelson on “Lay Me Down.” This song is classic gold. This song talks about the contentment both performers feel in the life they have led. There’s a sense of spirit and deftness this song brings to the listener that I have never felt before. Both singer’s vocals easily glide over the melody with confidence and breadth. This is a piece of country gold from some of the last real country survivors. This songs a treasure chest that you get something new out of with each listen.

To be honest, I was expecting something amazing with this album, but I was not expecting it to place me in a musical trance. This album completely takes over your spirit as you travel through it. It is full of emotions, strife, triumph, strength, and accomplishment, but the most important quality this album exemplifies is wisdom.

loretta-lynn-full-circle-cover-413x413This album is your mom, grandmother, or mentor simply sitting in their chair telling you of their life and what they have done. They tell you all about the good times and they never shy away from giving advice, yet they don’t shield you from the downtimes. This album is simply life as narrated by Loretta Lynn.The title of the album, Full Circle, describes the journey these songs take you on while visiting old habits and discovering new gems.

This is just the first album of nearly 96 new recordings Lynn has made. It is dubbed as “Volume One of The Cash Cabin Recordings.” I am already eagerly awaiting volume 2. It’s just like the story the Judds told us about grandpa, but now it’s grandma’s turn. Grandma’s are the salt of the earth and this grandma has just begun talking.

And as we all know, you never tell Grandma to hush unless you want to go to fist city.

Clear Country: The Leona Williams Experience

This article was originally posted on The Vinyl Vortex. The original article and others by Gabe Crawford can be found here. Follow Gabe Crawford on Twitter for all his music musings @gabecrawford and @thevinylvortex.


 

I love real country and western music. The material that is released today is something, but it is not founded in what was once country. Give me music with endless fiddles and steel guitars, and I’ll have it made.

This weekend I did just that. I found the perfect pure country show. It was in a little theater in Collinsville, OK. This show was held in the Herron’s Crown Opry Theater on main street. I had gathered word from a few websites and friends that Leona Williams, along with her son Ron Williams, would be gracing the stage at this renovated movie theater.

I am used to traveling many hours and miles to see my favorite singers and performers, but this time it was different. Instead of traveling hours to go to an arena to see a huge over produced show, I found myself speeding down the turnpike to find small town Oklahoma. I have spent $100’s on tickets before to these concerts, yet the ones for this show were just a mere $10. There was one big difference between the tickets I have spent $100’s on and this $10 show.

I wasn’t in the least bit disappointed

FullSizeRender-1 The show began with a local act, Will Clark and The Back When Country was Country band. They played a great set showing that country purist do not stand alone. Next, Ron Williams took the stage. It’s always a pleasure to hear him sing. He is country to his core and easily echoes many of the greats like Merle Haggard, Conway Twitty, and George Jones.

Then it was time for the main event, country pioneer Leona Williams. Some remember Leona from her work and marriage to Merle Haggard, which was littered with musical gems, but Leona’s solo music she made before Haggard and now after is simply country gold.

It wasn’t long after Williams took the stage that she went into one of my favorite songs, “Yes Ma’am (He Found Me in a Honky Tonk).” This single was released in 1970 to rave reviews and garnered Williams some serious air play. It sounds just as good today as it did in 1970, except when she sings it now, I think she is reminiscing. I don’t think Williams frequents honky tonks.

Williams’ show covered so much ground of both the history of her career and the history of country music. She is a gifted storyteller and had many stories to tell over her relationship with Merle Haggard and her close friendship with George Jones. These first hand anecdotes are priceless.
Around the middle of the show, Williams sang “You Take Me For Granted” and “Someday When Things are Good,” which were both number one hits for Merle Haggard. She also sang Connie Smith’s smash hit “Dallas,” which she also wrote. Although these songs by their “original” artists are classics, there is something different hearing them from the songwriter. There’s more honesty and sincerity. You can hear the connection to the heart. Leona is at her best singing songs she wrote.

Williams covered some of her more recent recordings which include “Melted Down Memories” and “New Patches.” Her new material is great and is just as good as anything she has unnamed released. She is still on the top of her game. She doesn’t know how to give less than 100%.

She closed out the show with some good fashioned country gospel. What I love about country gospel is its sincerity. You can sense the faith in the music. First she sang with Will Clark and her son Ron Williams, “Sing Me Back Home.” She then went into “I Saw The Light” and “I’ll Fly Away” with her son Ron. This was one of the biggest highlights of the show. There was an aura between Leona and Ron that only a mother and son could create. Their warmth was felt throughout the whole theater and their genuineness struck home with every patron.

This was my second time I have seen Leona in concert, and this time I realized just why I am a fan. Leona not only sings pure country music, she sings clear country music.

Leona’s music is completely untainted by any modern trends. She keeps country music alive with each note. Her singing is sterling silver and music unadulterated. She proves that real, unfiltered, clear country music doesn’t need anything new.

Simply put, when the old garment is country music, there is not any need for new patches.

Check out my review of Leona Williams’ and Merle Haggard’s album, Heart to Heart, here.

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